Frequently Asked Questions

Why Use RigDig?

What are RigDig’s primary information sources?

What is NMVTIS?

What information is required to be reported to NMVTIS?

Which state DMV’s are not in Compliance with NMVTIS?

What is Title Washing?

What is VIN Cloning?

What is the FMCSA?

What Accident information is included in RigDig™?

How current is RigDig’s information?

What happens if I run more or less reports than my subscription plan?

What are RigDig Rollover Reports™?

Do subscription plans have a term commitment?

How long can I access RigDig™ reports that I have purchased?

Why Use RigDig?

Every truck has a story to tell.  It might have been in a flood.  It could have a junk title, a history of poor maintenance, or even been involved in an over-turn accident.  Protect yourself with a RigDig truck history report.  RigDig reports are affordable and powered by the most comprehensive and most trusted information sources available.  You get vital intelligence to make smart buys in and easy-to-use report.  Whether you’re a fleet manager, dealer, or owner-operator, you need a watchdog.  Learn more about the data sources and what it means to you.

Does RigDig help protect you from a bad investment?

Absolutely!  RigDig reports help tell the story behind a truck.  It might have been in flood.  It could have a junk title, a history or poor maintenance, or even been involved in an over-turn accident.
Is RigDig the best source of information to the used truck buyer?

Absolutely!  Developed specifically to help the used truck buyer make more informed purchase decisions, RigDig reports are powered by the most comprehensive and the most trusted information sources available to the commercial vehicle industry.
Do RigDig reports tell you everything about a truck?

No. But we’re continuing to work hard to pack RigDig reports with even more information.  Although we don’t have everything, RigDig is the best source of information for the used truck buyer!


What are RigDig’s primary information sources?

The information provided in RigDig Truck History Reports are compiled from tens of thousands of information sources. Including, but not limited to:

ADD_logo_500x104 RigDig integrates information from Junk Yards, Salvage Yards, Auto Recyclers, Insurance Carriers and State Titling Agencies from the National Motor Vehicle Title Information Systme (NMVTIS).
The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is RigDig’s primary source of federally recordable accidents, post-accident inspections, inspection violations and carrier information.
RigDig Business Intelligence is the primary source for vehicle specifications. Additionally, it provides all the labor, resources and magic to tie a VIN with the associated carrier.
Equipment Data Associates (EDA) is RigDig’s primary source of Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) related liens and terminations.

 

What is NMVTIS?

Created by the Anti-Car Theft Act of 1992, the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) is required to include data from all state motor vehicle agencies (DMV), including brand information that describes a vehicle’s prior use and condition. In addition, NMVTIS is the only vehicle history database in the nation to which all states, insurance carriers, and junk and salvage yards are required by federal law to report. Read More.

NMVTIS is important to the used vehicle consumer — Vehicle fraud is a profitable business and NMVTIS information can help the consumer identify fraud before they make a bad purchase decision (statistics from the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA)).

  • In 2005, some 570,000 vehicles were affected by hurricanes – These vehicles are perfect targets for vehicle title fraud (title washing).
  • 1.3 million vehicles are stolen each year – These vehicles are perfect targets for VIN cloning and false titles.
  • Auto theft alone costs consumers and insurance companies $8 billion per year.
  • Only 63% of vehicles reported stolen are recovered – If it is recovered, the unsuspecting buyer of the stolen vehicle could be out the vehicle and their money.
  • “VIN Cloning” is a growing trend – NMVTIS data sources help the consumer identify VIN Cloning red flags (i.e. VIN showed up at a Junk or Salvage yard).

NMVTIS Background — The Anti Car Theft Act of 1992 was enacted to deter trafficking in stolen vehicles by strengthening law enforcement against auto theft (Title I), combating automobile title fraud (Title II), preventing “chop shop” related thefts (Title III), and inspecting exports for stolen vehicles (Title IV).  Title II of the Act required the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) to implement a National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS). The Act specifies that the information within NMVTIS shall be available to jurisdictions; federal, state and local law enforcement officials; insurance carriers; and other prospective purchasers (e.g., individuals, auction companies, and used car dealers).  The Anti Car Theft Improvements Act of 1996 was signed into law on July 2, 1996. It amends the Anti Car Theft Act of 1992 to give the Department of Justice the responsibility for the information system.

What information is required to be reported to NMVTIS?

Over 28.1 million salvage or total loss records have been reported to NMVTIS.  Over 9,000 auto recyclers, junk yards, salvage yards, and insurance carriers in the U.S. are reporting, or registered to report, to NMVTIS.

Below are the legal reporting requirements for each of the NMVTIS reporting types. If you want some really fun reading material, here are the NMVTIS Final Regulations.

1. Auto Recyclers, Junk and Salvage Yards — Effective March 31, 2009

NMVTIS serves as a repository of information related to vehicles that have been in the possession of auto recyclers, junk yards and salvage yards. This repository is then used by states and consumers to ensure that junk or salvage vehicles are not later re-sold and ensures that the VINs from destroyed vehicles can never be used for a stolen auto (see www.nicb.org). Thieves use the VINs from destroyed vehicles because they know that the true VIN will never appear again on the road and because they know that if the VINs are reported to state motor vehicle titling agencies, there is a strong likelihood that the reporting may not result in a flagged or retired record (also known as a “kill title” report). Because NMVTIS reporting is mandated and because consumers and states can access the information, the system makes it much easier to detect attempts to use VINs from destroyed or salvage vehicles in cloning operations.

By no later than March 31, 2009, and continuing on a monthly basis as designated by the operator, any individual or entity engaged in the business of operating a junk yard or salvage yard within the United States shall provide any inventory of all junk automobiles or salvage automobiles obtained in whole or in part by the entity in the prior month.  They must include a statement of whether the automobile was crushed or disposed of, for sale or other purposes, and if the vehicle is intended for export out of the United States.  Junk and salvage yards may be required to file an update or supplemental report of final disposition of any automobile where final disposition information was not available at the time of the initial report filing, or if their actual disposition of the automobile differs from what was initially reported.  Types of entities included in this category of reporting include scrap vehicle shredders and scrap metal processors, as well as “pull- or pick-apart yards,” salvage pools, salvage auctions, and other types of auctions, businesses, and individuals that handle salvage vehicles.

Exceptions to the reporting requirements:

  • Auto recyclers and junk and salvage yards are not required to report any vehicle that is determined not to meet the definition of salvage or junk after a good-faith physical and value appraisal conducted by qualified appraisal personnel, entirely independent of any other persons or entities.
  • Auto recyclers and junk and salvage yards that handle fewer than five vehicles per year that are determined to be salvage (including total loss) or junk are not required to report to NMVTIS consistent with federal legal requirements for automobile dealers.

2. Insurance Carriers and Self-Insurers — Effective March 31, 2009

By no later than March 31, 2009, Insurance companies and certain self insurers must report monthly to NMVTIS on the junk and salvage automobiles they obtain that are of the current model year or any of the four prior model years. The Anti-Car Theft Act defines a salvage automobile as “an automobile that is damaged by collision, fire, flood, accident, trespass, or other event, to the extent that its fair salvage value plus the cost of repairing the automobile for legal operation on public streets, roads, and highways would be more than the fair market value of the automobile immediately before the event that caused the damage.” The Department of Justice has also determined that this definition includes all automobiles found to be a total loss under the laws of the applicable state, or designated as a total loss by the insurance carrier under the terms of its policies, regardless of whether an insurance carrier retitles the vehicle into its name or allows the owner to retain the vehicle. The determination that “total loss” is included in the definition of salvage is to ensure that the reporting of salvage automobiles is comprehensive.

In addition, although not specifically required by the Anti-Car Theft Act, the Department of Justice strongly encourages insurance carriers to provide information on other motor vehicles, including older model automobiles, and other information relevant to a motor vehicle’s title. The reporting of this information by insurance carriers will help reduce instances in which thieves use the VINs of junk or salvage motor vehicles on stolen motor vehicles and will assist in preventing and eliminating fraud.

3. State Motor Vehicle Title Agencies (DMV) — Effective January 1, 2010

By no later than January 1, 2010, each state must provide at a frequency of once every 24 hours, titling information for all automobiles maintained by the state.  The titling information provided to NMVTIS must include any description of the automobile included on the certificate of title (including any and all brands associated with such vehicle).

Which state DMV’s are not in Compliance with NMVTIS?

Currently, 88% of the U.S. DMV data is represented in the NMVTIS system.  Under the Anti-Car Theft Act, as of Jan 1, 2010 all state DMV’s were required to report to NMVTIS every 24 hours, however not all states are in compliance. This non-compliance affects the Title Registrations and Title Brands available in RigDig. However, it has no impact on the Junk, Salvage and Insurance information provided by NMVTIS to RigDig.  All non-compliant states are at different stages of meeting their compliance requirements.

The non-compliant states that represent the remaining 12% of activity include:  The District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Mississippi, Oregon, Rhode Island and Vermont.

***Last updated 6/8/12

As a quick reminder, the state DMV non-compliance with the Jan 1, 2010 deadline only affects the Title, Title Brand and Odometer Brand information provided in RigDig.  All the other important information, such as rollover-accidents, total loss insurance claims, etc. are not provided by state DMV’s and are not affected.

***Last updated 7/30/11

What is Title Washing?

When a truck’s title is stamped with a title or odometer brand, such as “Junk”, “Salvage”, “Flooded” or “Odometer Not Actual Mileage”, the truck immediately has a lower market value and will be more difficult to sell.

That’s why sellers (criminals) use a process of washing off the brand from the title.  Sellers wash the title by transferring a title branded vehicle to a state that doesn’t recognize the brand. Or, by altering the title so the new state doesn’t realize the vehicle previously included a brand.  When the state issues a new title, it can result in a clean title.  This clean title is what the seller (criminal) will present to an unsuspecting buyer.

To help protect the consumer’s interest, RigDig partnered with the Department of Justice’s NMVTIS database to help consumers detect previous title brands that may have been washed from the current title.

What is VIN Cloning?

VIN Cloning is a growing crime, where criminals take the vehicle identification number (VIN) from a wrecked vehicle while it is sitting in a junkyard, then create new VIN plates for a stolen vehicle of the same make, model, year and color.  Learn more about VIN Cloning from the National White Collar Crime Center.

What is the FMCSA?

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has a mission to reduce crashes, injuries and fatalities involving large trucks and buses. The FMCSA was established as a separate administration within the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) on January 1, 2000, pursuant to the Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999. FMCSA is headquartered in Washington, DC and employs more than 1,000 people in all 50 States and the District of Columbia, all dedicated to improving the safety of commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and saving lives.

In carrying out its safety mandate to reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses, FMCSA:

  • Develops and enforces data-driven regulations that balance motor carrier (truck and bus companies) safety with industry efficiency
  • Harnesses safety information systems to focus on higher risk carriers in enforcing the safety regulations
  • Targets educational messages to carriers, commercial drivers, and the public
  • Partners with stakeholders including Federal, State, and local enforcement agencies, the motor carrier industry, safety groups, and organized labor on efforts to reduce bus and truck-related crashes

What Accident information is included in RigDig™?

RigDig™ reports provide information on both federally recordable accidents and post-accident inspections. 

Federally recordable accidents are the most severe accidents that involve an injury, a fatality, or was involved in a tow-away accident. Since 2000, there have been over 600,000 federally recordable accidents involving a tow-away for class 3-8 trucks (for valid VINs) reported in RigDig. Of these accidents, over 23,000 resulted in a fatality.

RigDig™ reports also provide information on post-accident inspections. Often, a less severe, non-federally recordable accident may be identified by a post-accident inspection. Since 2000, there have been over 139,000 post-accident inspections for class 3 – 8 trucks.

Please be aware that not all accidents are reported to RigDig™. The less severe, fender benders are not typically reported to RigDig™. In addition, RigDig™ does not report accidents where the VIN may have been inaccurately documented.

How current is RigDig’s information?

When making a used truck purchase, having the most up-to-date information can help you avoid purchase mistakes!  And RigDig’s team of 55+ associates works hard to bring you the information as quickly as possible.  RigDig’s information is compiled from tens of thousands of sources throughout the United States; and the frequency by which these sources varies greatly.

In regards to some of our data sources for the most vital information, such as Title Brands (i.e. Junk, Salvage, Flooded), we receive the data in real-time.  Our partnership with the Department of Justice’s NMVTIS database allows us to deliver information in RigDig as it happens.  This can protect you from purchasing a vehicle that was just stamped with a “Salvage” brand earlier in the day.  Those big consumer vehicle reports for cars don’t even have have that ability.

While some of the most vital information is updated in real-time, other data sources are updated daily, weekly, bi-weekly, monthly or sometimes longer.  For example, a federally recordable accident may have occurred three weeks ago, but that information source may not report it to us for another week.

What happens if I run more or less reports than my subscription plan?

Whether you run more or less reports than your plan, you don’t need to worry!  We understand your business needs for Truck History Reports will vary from month-to-month. And we want you to have peace of mind about these normal business fluctuations.

If you run more than your plan minimum — No problem!  Additional reports will be invoiced at your plan’s per report price.  And as your business needs change, you can upgrade or downgrade your plan at any time.  Changes would take effect on the next billing cycle.

If you run less than your plan minimum — No problem!  We developed RigDig Rollover Reports so you don’t have to worry about your un-used reports.

What are RigDig Rollover Reports™?

We understand your business needs for Truck History Reports will vary from month-to-month.  And we don’t want you to worry about these normal business fluctuations — that’s why we introduced RigDig Rollover Reports™.

Here’s how it works.  Let’s say you typically take in 50 used trucks a month from trade-in or auction, so you subscribe to the 50 reports plan (see subscription plans).  However, in the first month you end up only using 35 reports.  Don’t worry, we’re not going to take any of these reports away from you.  In this case the 15 unused reports will be rolled-over to use in future months.

As long as you maintain any type of RigDig subscription account, your rollover reports will never expire.  However, if you choose to cancel your account, you will lose all unused rollover reports.


Do subscription plans have a term commitment?

RigDig Truck History Reports are your first step in making smart buys and avoiding big mistakes, helping you make more informed used truck purchase decisions!  We’re confident RigDig Truck History Reports will become part of your business process when you buy or sell used trucks. And that’s why we’re not going to require you to sign-up for a lengthy contract – rather we will just let the power of the reports keep you hooked with us!

However, if for any reason you want to close your account, you can cancel at any time.  Once you choose to cancel your account, it will close following your current billing cycle.  Please be aware that upon closing your account you will forfeit any rollover reports remaining in your account.

*** Note: While all standard subscription plans do not have a term commitment, this does not apply to customers who may sign a special agreement with RigDig that would clearly outline a term commitment.

How long can I access RigDig™ reports that I have purchased?

To ensure your RigDig™ reports contain current information regarding the VIN, the reports are available for up-to 60 days from the original date they were purchased. After 60 days, please run a new RigDig™ report to get the most current information regarding the VIN.

RigDig™
A Randall-Reilly Information Business
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Charlotte, NC 28270


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Why Use RigDig™
Protect your customers, your investments and your reputation. Let RigDig™ shield you from the unknown on trade-in and auction buys. Powered by the most comprehensive and the most trusted data sources available, RigDig™ Truck History Reports help you make more informed used truck purchase decisions. Whether you are a fleet manager, a dealer or owner-operator, don't make a deal without knowing as much as possible about a truck's history. Make better investments - get a RigDig™.